FEAST OF STS. PETER AND PAUL

FEAST OF STS. PETER AND PAUL
• WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28 – 6 p.m. Great Vespers
• THURSDAY, JUNE 29 – 6:30 a.m. Divine Liturgy

 


Deacon Stephen Wood!

Bishop David of Alaska with Seminary and Guest Clergy - Deacon Stephen is the redhead

Bishop David of Alaska with seminary and guest clergy – Deacon Stephen is the redhead

Stephen Wood, who grew up here in Holy Resurrection, was ordained deacon May 14 at St. Herman’s Seminary, Kodiak, Alaska, where he has finished his second year of studies. He is the son of Subdeacon John (Norman) Wood, our choir director, and his wife Leslie. Subdeacon John went to Kodiak to participate in the service. See videos of his ordination here, and his first litany here.

We congratulate Deacon Stephen and his wife, Stephanie, and their children Ephraim, Yakov, and Alexei. Axios! Axios! Axios! – Hometown boy makes good!

With employees

Deacon Stephen also founded and operates a floor covering business in Kodak. Here he is pictured with Bishop David and three of his employees, Thomas Phillips, J.R Amodo, and Martha Fox.

In other good news, Deacon Stephen’s sister, Mary, her husband, Subdeacon Bart Coppola, and their children Elizabeth, Nevin, Luca, Levi, have moved to Clinton. Welcome home, Mary!


Feast of Pentecost

 

Icon of Pentecost

O Heavenly King, Comforter, Spirit of Truth, Who art everywhere present and fillest all things, Come and abide in us, cleanse us from every impurity, and save our souls, O Good One!

On Sunday, June 4, we will celebrate the Feast of Pentecost (see Acts 2). This is the culmination of the Great Fifty Days (Pentecost) beginning with our Lord’s Resurrection. He has taken our human nature as his own, died for our sins, risen victorious over sin, Satan, and death, ascended triumphant to reign at the right hand of the Father, and now, as He promised, sends the Holy Spirit to teach us all things and bring to our remembrance all things He has said to us (St. John 14:16-26).

Read more about Pentecost:

By Fr. Andrew Morbey

By Fr. Thomas Hopko

 


Holy Resurrection Talent Show

The Big Band

The Big Band

We have a (more or less) annual talent show at Holy Resurrection, at which members entertain each other with music, comedy routines, and such. We know we could make a lot of money if we sold tickets to the public, but we prefer to keep it free.

Here are some video and pictures of our recent show on May 21, produced by Johnny Cano with the help of Claudia Singletary and Andrea Thorn. Enjoy!

Wait ’til the Sun Shines, Nelly – Al Dietrich, Norman Wood, Steve Long, Johnny Cano

A Certain Girl – Dale Williams, Steve Long, Andrew Thorn, Paula Sartor, Claudia Singletary, Atticus Long, Johnny Cano

Paula_johnny

Paula Sartor, Johnny Cano, Steve Long

Kirakosyans

Sati and Michael Kirakosyan

Hancock1

Jim Hancock, Bugler


Our Church School

Stairs

During the school year our children have a short class after Liturgy, usually discussing the Gospel for the day, with several adults led by Andrea Thorn. Here are pictures of some of them the last day of church school.

 Tree


Ascension of the Lord – May 25, 2017

ascension

Services:

Wednesday, May 24, 6 p.m.  –  Vigil (Vespers and Matins)

Thursday, May 25, 6:30 a.m. –  Divine Liturgy

About the Ascension

 


+ Jean Nixon

Nixon_Jean

Jean fell asleep in the Lord Wednesday, May 17, after a long illness.

Read Obituary

All visitation and services will be at Holy Resurrection Orthodox Church, 414 E. College St, Clinton, MS – Directions

Jean will be brought to the Church Thursday, May 18, at 4:15 p.m..

Visitation Thursday will be 4:30 – 6:30 p.m.

Panikhida (Memorial Prayers) will be at 6:30 p.m.

Visitation Friday, May 19, 9 – 10 a.m.

Funeral Service Friday 10 a.m.

Burial following at 430 Lakewood South Memorial Park, 430 McCluer Rd., Jackson, MS 39212 – Map

Mercy Meal following at the Church

May her memory be eternal.


Members Speak about Holy Resurrection

 

In connection with our Fortieth Year Celebration, we invited current and former members to write of their memories of our church. Here we publish some that were submitted.

 

From Victoria Anis, now living in Camarillo, California:

January 26, 2017
Dearest Father Paul,
Thank you so much for asking me to participate in the blessed 40th anniversary of our dear Holy Resurrection Church. I am only sorry that I could not be there in person to celebrate with you and our entire Church family. What an honor it is for me to write this letter for this beautiful occasion!
When I think back to 1977 in Jackson, Mississippi (which seems like a lifetime ago) I am immediately filled with warm memories. I recall a small group of us, my late husband, Dr. Onssy Anis, Dr. Frank Kulik, and a few others getting together to start The Holy Resurrection Church. Then God, in his amazing grace, blessed us with Father Paul and his family. It was an amazing time in all of our lives when we realized we would actually have a church of our own. . . Read More

From Elizabeth Freels, now living in Oregon:

Freels_2017

Dear friends,

It is with great pleasure and honor that I want to share my thoughts about Holy Resurrection.

Just like it happens to so many, I first came to our Church in times of despair and loneliness. And to this day I believe that finding our Church was the best thing that happened to my family in my twenty something years of living in Mississippi. I have turned from being Orthodox friendly to discovering my Faith, I have found a wonderful community to bring up my children and I have learned unconditional love, non-judgment and have started beautiful friendships that will last a lifetime… Read More

From Rod and Ruth Taylor, Shreveport:

To the Faithful of Holy Resurrection,

In 1992 our family made a job-related move to Louisiana from our native state of Oregon.  Our dear friends, and Ruth’s Godparents, Ted and Anastacia Feldman, had left our home parish of St. Nicholas in Portland a few years earlier to wander into this strange and mysterious place called the south.  And here we were following them  into that very same place.  We were excited to meet them at their new parish, Holy Resurrection, which was only a two hour drive for them every Sunday.  For us it was a mere three hours from Shreveport.  “This will only happen once” was what I thought, but as we were completely enchanted with the hospitality and sincere seeking of the Orthodox lifestyle we found in the little house that had been converted (just like us) into the Orthodox world, it happened once – every other Sunday.  Read more.

From Yuliya Paukku, now living in Minneapolis:

Dear Fr. Paul and HROC, Happy Fortieth Year Anniversary! pavlenko

My husband and I were members of the HROC for several years while I was working on my PhD. Two years after I got my degree we moved to Minnesota (in 2012). For us HROC was a solid foundation and a family for several years.  We did not have family in the US (we came from Ukraine), but HROC became our family. There are a lot of stories I could tell, but I especially remember the following:

In 2009 our son Constantin was born, so a couple of months before, women of HROC organized a baby shower for me and supplied our family with all the necessary things for months and probably even years, from diapers, blankets and bottles  to a bouncer, stroller, a car seat and everything else that a new mother would need. This was such a huge help for us. Read more.

From Paula Sartor, Clinton:Sartor_Paula

My Journey to Orthodoxy began in childhood. My parents, my brother and I regularly attended one of the mainline protestant churches (Methodist) in our Mississippi town. Our church stood within sight of three differing (denominational) churches; indeed there were seven different denominations in a half-mile path – all worshiping the Lord Jesus Christ as the one true God.

Our church used the Apostles’ Creed in worship, which contains the statement, “I believe in one holy, catholic church”; and although the word “catholic” was explained to me as meaning everywhere, or universal, I was puzzled by the claim. I can recall frequently wondering, and even asking my parents, “….but why are there so many different kinds of churches?” The answer was, basically, that “there are just all kinds of people”, or, “people just believe differently”. Over the years I developed numerous preconceived notions, opinions and even prejudices about church and Christendom. Read more.


Christ is Risen!

descent_hades_8x11

Icon by Fr Andrew Tregubov

Paschal Sermon of St. John Chrysostom (d. 407)

If any man be devout and love God, let him enjoy this fair and radiant triumphal feast. If any man be a wise servant, let him rejoicing enter into the joy of his Lord. If any have labored long in fasting, let him now receive his recompense. If any have wrought from the first hour, let him today receive his just reward. If any have come at the third hour, let him with thankfulness keep the feast. If any have arrived at the sixth hour, let him have no misgivings; because he shall in nowise be deprived thereof. If any have delayed until the ninth hour, let him draw near, fearing nothing. If any have tarried even until the eleventh hour, let him, also, be not alarmed at his tardiness; for the Lord, who is jealous of his honor, will accept the last even as the first; he gives rest unto him who comes at the eleventh hour, even as unto him who has wrought from the first hour.

And he shows mercy upon the last, and cares for the first; and to the one he gives, and upon the other he bestows gifts. And he both accepts the deeds, and welcomes the intention, and honors the acts and praises the offering. Wherefore, enter you all into the joy of your Lord; and receive your reward, both the first, and likewise the second. You rich and poor together, hold high festival. You sober and you heedless, honor the day. Rejoice today, both you who have fasted and you who have disregarded the fast. The table is full-laden; feast ye all sumptuously. The calf is fatted; let no one go hungry away. (more…)


Holy Week Schedule and Commentary – 2017

April 8 – 16, 2017

The Orthodox Holy Week and Pascha services set before us a rich feast of Christian experience that no seeker of God should miss. This article is to speak briefly of them to give our guests an idea what to expect. Many people ask me how long these services last, so I have given the time as well as I remember. Orthodox are not very conscious of time in the Church services; if you think you can’t stay for the entire service, just come for what you can.

LAZARUS SATURDAY, April 8, 9:00 a.m. – This is the Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom such as we have on most Sundays, celebrating the raising of Lazarus (John 11). It lasts about an hour and 45 minutes. This is considered the beginning of Holy Week, since His love for His friend Lazarus and his sisters Mary and Martha was the immediate reason that Our Lord returned to Judea (John 11:8). This service is served in bright vestments as the raising of Lazarus is a precursor of Our Lord’s own Resurrection and ours.

Palm Sunday 2009PALM SUNDAY, April 9, 9:30 a.m. – Procession with palms outdoors around the Church and Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom. This is a festive service recalling Our Lord’s triumphal entry into Jerusalem. After a meal we return to the Temple for the first Bridegroom Matins service, so that our out-of town members can attend it.

 

BRIDEGROOM MATINS is so called from the haunting theme song which begins:

Behold, the Bridegroom comes at midnight. And happy is that servant whom he shall find watching, But behold, unworthy is that servant whom he shall find heedless… (cf Matt. 25:1 ff, Luke 12:35 ff)

Our Lord is the Bridegroom whom His beloved bride, His people, were not ready to receive. At these services we read the scathing prophesies addressed these three days to the leaders of Israel (Matthew 21:18 – 23:39). Will we be ready when He comes? Each Bridegroom service lasts about an hour.

HOLY MONDAY and TUESDAY, April 10 – 11, 6 p.m. – Bridegroom Matins (see above).

HOLY WEDNESDAY EVENING, April 12, 6 p.m. – we bless olive oil and members are anointed with it for healing. Our Lord’s death and Resurrection are for our healing and salvation: “By His stripes we are healed” (Isaiah 53:5). This service lasts about an hour, and will be followed by Bridegroom Matins.

HOLY THURSDAY, April 13, noon – we serve the Vesperal Liturgy of St. Basil celebrating the Mystical Supper at which Our Lord washed His disciples’ feet and instituted the Eucharist.

HOLY THURSDAY, April 13, 6 p.m. – Matins of Holy Friday. During it we read twelve Gospel readings of Our Lord’s crucifixion, interspersed with some of the most beautiful hymns of the whole year. In the middle of this service a large Cross is placed in the center of the Church for veneration. This service lasts over two hours.

HOLY FRIDAY, April 14, 3 p.m. – Vespers. The Epitaphios, a fabric with an image of the Lord laid in the tomb, representing the burial cloth of the Lord, is carried in procession and laid on a special table covered with flowers representing His Tomb.

HOLY FRIDAY, April 14, 7 p.m. – Matins of Holy Saturday – the Epitaphios is carried in procession through the cemetery next to the Church, as Christ descended among the dead to raise them to himself. This service lasts about an hour and a half. The many readings and hymns of the Holy Friday services present us with many different facets of the awesome and compelling mystery of our Lord’s Passion.

HOLY SATURDAY, April 15, 9 a.m. – Initiation of new members and Divine Liturgy. This is the ‘Blessed Sabbath’ on which God rested — in the Tomb, the real meaning of Genesis 2:2. It is the most appropriate time for Baptism, as those baptized are ‘buried’ with Christ to share His Resurrection (Romans 6:3-4). Lent has its origin as the last intensive preparation for those who would be baptized this day. We read 15 Old Testament readings that illuminate Baptism, including the Creation and the Exodus. Our new members are  Baptized and Chrismated (Anointed), then  we continue with the Divine Liturgy. This service lasts about three hours.

HOLY SATURDAY, April 15, 11:30 p.m. – this is THE service of the year for Orthodox, and no one wants to miss it. At midnight all lights in the Church are put out. This is the darkness and silence of the Tomb. Finally the bishop or priest comes out of the altar with a candle. Everyone comes forward and lights a candle from this light. Carrying the candles, we make a procession outside around the Temple, coming back to the front porch. There we hear the greeting ‘Christ is Risen!’ for the first time and reply, ‘Indeed He is Risen!’ We will greet each other this way for forty days. We go into the Temple, now brightly lighted and adorned with flowers, and sing the joyous Paschal Matins and Liturgy, and members receive the Body and Blood of the Risen Lord. After this service we go to the Parish Hall and find the tables sagging with every kind of good food, and we celebrate together until quite late.

SUNDAY April 16, there is NO MORNING SERVICE (the midnight service was the Sunday Liturgy).

SUNDAY, April 16, 4 p.m. we will gather for the short, joyous Paschal Vespers and more feasting. This will take place at Holy Trinity and St. John the Theologian Greek Orthodox Church, Pear Orchard Rd. at Old Canton Rd., Jackson. Members and clergy of Holy Resurrection and St. Peter Orthodox Church, Madison, will participate. The Jackson area Orthodox churches do this service together every year; join us for the service and the feast afterwards.

Read more about Holy Week